. Men’s Three Piece Suits – How a Man wears a Vested 2-Piece Suit

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Standing out in a crowd is as simple as adding a waistcoat – and when a simpler look is called for the vest can always be removed, unlike the equally striking but less flexible double-breasted jacket.

Waistcoats add to the character of a basic 2-piece suit; a matching fabric waistcoat can transform a two piece suit to a level below evening wear but above simple business dress while a contrasting odd vest can make a drab grey outfit (and the man wearing it) more lively and approachable.

The vested or three-piece men’s suit is the matched outgrowth of the waistcoat; it commonly consists of a single-breasted jacket, a waistcoat, and trousers all made from the same material and lining.

As this definition implies, an odd vest and suit – defined as a waistcoat made from a different fabric than the jacket and trouser – is not a true three-piece suit.

As aforementioned, depending on the fabric chosen an odd vest can raise or lower the outfit’s formality.

However, for the purposes of this article we

HairStyles For 2016

2016hairtrends-shortWe hope that, by now, you’re au fait with which buttons on your suit to fasten (never the bottom, unless it’s a one-button). What shade a leather belt should be (the same as your shoes). And the best place to store slogan tees (a fireplace). But there’s some subtler slip-ups that even men with otherwise on-point style can overlook.

Think of these as the inner sanctum style rules. The kind of things that most guys won’t notice, but which those in the know can’t unsee. Let your initiation to fashion’s upper echelons begin.

Your Shoes Are Laced Like You Wore Them Out Of The Shop

Shoes come with zig-zag lacing by default because it looks tidy without a foot in. But whether you’re more partial to trainers or brogues, it’s a pattern that does your footwear a disservice; the off-centre lacing pulls the upper when you tighten up, warping it.

While we hope you’ve long since abandoned the notion that a bright pair of laces makes a pair of shoes pop, rocking an individual lacing pattern

Little Things You Don’t Realise Are Killing Your Style

shoelacing

We hope that, by now, you’re au fait with which buttons on your suit to fasten (never the bottom, unless it’s a one-button). What shade a leather belt should be (the same as your shoes). And the best place to store slogan tees (a fireplace). But there’s some subtler slip-ups that even men with otherwise on-point style can overlook.

Think of these as the inner sanctum style rules. The kind of things that most guys won’t notice, but which those in the know can’t unsee. Let your initiation to fashion’s upper echelons begin.

Your Shoes Are Laced Like You Wore Them Out Of The Shop

Shoes come with zig-zag lacing by default because it looks tidy without a foot in. But whether you’re more partial to trainers or brogues, it’s a pattern that does your footwear a disservice; the off-centre lacing pulls the upper when you tighten up, warping it.

While we hope you’ve long since abandoned the notion that a bright pair of laces makes a pair of shoes pop, rocking an individual

Men’s Shirt Collars: A Frame for the Face

Men’s dress shirt collars come in all different colors, sizes, and styles. However, one thing holds true for all of them: They are the frame for the face.

Regardless of the type of suit jacket or tie, ones shirt collar is always visible, and plays a major role in determining how the wearer’s face will appear to observers.

Choosing the right shirt collar will ensure you enhance your facial strengths while downplaying any irregularities.

Collars come in a variety of individual styles, though there are two main types: Turndown collars and wing collars.

Turndown Collars

Turndown collars are the staple found on gentlemen’s shirts, and offer the most opportunity for individual taste. These collars, as the name suggests, are turned down, forming a sort of triangle whose angles vary with the particular look one is aiming for.

Although there are countless variations, the turndown collar comes in two main categories: the point and the cutaway.

Point Collar

The point collar is the most common collar style, where the collar is cut so that the “points” are reasonably close together, sometimes to the extent that they almost hide the top portion

Men’s Suit Colors: Tan – Khaki – Taupe Suits ntroduction to the Tan Suit

The English language has an abundance of words that all imply a light brownish-gray color.

Different designers frequently use different words for the same color, or the same word for very different colors.

For purposes of stylistic discussion they all behave about the same — you won’t find any set of circumstances where a “tan” suit would be appropriate but “khaki” wouldn’t be.

In their most common usage the different styles of light coat break down as follows:

  • Tan refers to light, predominantly brown shades.
  • Dun refers to a darker brown than tan, sometimes with a greenish tint.
  • Khaki is the most dominantly yellow shade of the related colors, with little brown or gray.
  • Taupe is a darker color with gray tones as well as brown.

These are, however, only general guidelines, and every store or designer will have a slightly different take on each color.  It’s not impossible to see other terms as well — just remember that, from a stylistic standpoint, they all follow the same rules.  Which one to purchase will be a matter of taste, complexion, and budget.

Formality of the Tan Suit

Light

Men’s Suit Colors: A Man and the Charcoal Gray Suit Introduction to the Charcoal Gray Men’s Suit

The better part of most men’s clothing stores’ suit inventory comes in one color: charcoal gray.

The dark matte gray has become the standard of business dress, and by far the most ubiquitous option.

It is always appropriate, easy to match, and flattering to nearly all complexions; all of which account for its overwhelming popularity.

It also makes charcoal gray almost certain to dominate the male side of any well-dressed social occasion, and therefore one of the hardest colors to stand out uniquely in.

Formality of a Charcoal Gray Suit

The near-black charcoal is considered the ideal in business formality. Its only competitor is navy blue, another deep hue that offers the same advantages: closeness to the formal black without its tuxedo associations and matching challenges.

Charcoal gray suits can be worn at any level of business or social occasion that is not “black tie.” Plain, unpatterned charcoal gray is the ideal alternative to formalwear at a “black tie optional” event.

Patterning reduces the formality of any color, including dark charcoal gray. A modest pinstriping still leaves a suit adequately formal for most business occasions, however — unbroken charcoal is

The Men’s Suit: Exploring Colo

The first thing anyone notices about a man’s suit – before the cut, the number of buttons, the proportions – is the color.

First impressions are incredibly powerful, and so it becomes obvious that the color of ones suit isn’t a decision to make lightly.

It need not, however be a daunting task; like much of the rest of classic style, suit color is governed by a few simple rules that, once learned, make color selection an easy task.

The first bit of information to learn is that when it comes to suits, all colors are not equal.

There are certain colors that are appropriate for any occasion, and others that while suitable for one occasion would be completely out of place at another.

Also important to know is that some colors are limited by season, while others have particular associations that, if unknown, could produce unexpected results for the uninformed wearer.

A Man’s First Suit

The single suit – that is, a suit for someone who rarely has cause to wear it, and thus has just the one suit.

This is often a “wedding and funeral” garment, as it

A Man and the Double Breasted Suit Jacket

Every coat that has a collar and lapels, whether sport coat, suit jacket, or overcoat, is either single-breasted or double-breasted.

The single-breasted construction is much more common, and consists of buttons on one edge and button holes on the other, meeting in a vertical line over the navel.

The double-breasted coat bears symmetrical sets of buttons on each side, with the left side folding over the right to be secured by one or two of them.

Single-breasted jackets are easy to find and look good on just about everyone.

Whether blazer or suit jacket, it can be made with two or three buttons, wide or narrow lapels, and high or low gorge, according to the particular needs of one’s body. For every man, there is a single-breasted configuration that is guaranteed to look handsome.

For this reason, the model as it has evolved over two-hundred years today holds the center-place of men’s style.

While the double-breasted coat demands a greater investment of time and effort to acquire and wear successfully, for many men the payoff is fantastic.

Since every man will own some single-breasted jackets and suits, the question of single

Men’s Suit Fabrics

When ordering a custom suit, a man is confronted with a sometimes daunting selection of fabrics.

While proportion and fit are mostly dictated by your body, you may select your suit’s fabric considering climate, occasion, and the image you hope to project.

What follows is a primer on textile terminology intended to demystify the world of suit fabrics.

For centuries now, most men’s suits have been made out of wool. This trusty textile drapes beautifully, maintains its form reliably, and can be spun (from raw fiber into yarn) and woven (from yarn into fabric) to be lightweight and breathable, or to be warm and cozy.

Worsted wool, from which most suits are made, goes through a finishing process that leaves it smooth and somewhat shiny.

Suitings are often categorized by fineness. The yarn number, e.g. 90s, originally meant the number of 560-yard spools a spinner could get out of a pound of raw wool at the thickness in question, with three-digit numbers earning the prefix “Super.”

Since textiles are not strictly regulated in most countries, these numbers may be exaggerated. Finer yarns are smoother in appearance, softer to the touch, and produce

The Men’s Suit: Exploring Patterns

Now that we’ve mastered suit color and picked out the basic suits that should be in every mans wardrobe, it’s time to begin thinking about adding patterns to the mix.

Patterned fabrics help bring a breath of fresh air into what can otherwise be a somewhat stilted selection of suits.

As one might expect, patterns are a bit more difficult than solid colors, and require more thought in their selection. As a general rule, patterns are less formal than solid colors, and so should be reserved for more relaxed occasions.

The exception to this rule is the pinstripe, which in all but the most formal cases is on par with any other dark colored suit, and indeed forms an integral part of certain kinds of formalwear.

The same is true of scale and constituent colors; large scale patterns are less formal than small scale ones, and bold, multicolored patterns are less formal than reserved, monochromatic ones.

Stripes

With that out of the way, the first pattern to consider is the stripe. Stripes on suits are always vertical, but come in a number of different styles. The first, foremost, and most classic is

The Importance of Proportion in Classical Men’s Clothing

The man who takes care with proportion in his suits and dress shirts always looks good.

Unfortunately, this point is woefully under appreciated today; it’s rare to find a man whose style is understated elegance, the kind of man who people feel is always well dressed without knowing why.

Most men’s suits and dress shirts sold in stores are available in only a few standard sizes and are constructed according to the fashion of their day.

It’s true that with proper tailoring most men can get a reasonable fit out of a retail suit or other garment, but with a suit especially there are so many opportunities for customization that one misses out on a lot when buying off the rack.

In retail, crucial details like gorge height, closure, button stance, and lapel width are dictated by the whims of fashion rather than the needs of a wearer’s unique body.

Most men’s suit and dress shirts are cut for a hypothetical model, a 1 in 100 man who doesn’t exist. Knowing this, it’s no surprise that most menswear does not flatter those of us who are taller, shorter, thinner, or heavier than the model that brand was cut

Men’s Style Basics – How to Choose a Men’s Tailor

Choosing a tailor used to be easy.

You either went with the tailor who had been servicing your father or you headed to the knowledgeable suit salesman who would make the proper introduction.

Today unfortunately, the task is harder.

Good tailors are hard to come by, and the average menswear salesman does not have the knowledge to point you in the right direction.

In this article, I equip you with the tools to find a reputable men’s tailor whose services can transform you and your clothing.

The below steps are in order of action to be taken, and are meant to be used in conjunction with one another to select a competent tailor.

The first point is very important, and should not be skipped.

Educate Yourself before looking for a Tailor

Before you talk with a tailor or seamstress, you need to have a foundation in the basics of men’s style.

The hardest thing for most men to do is to find a few hours to sit down and read about suits, shirts, and other menswear; however most men find once they start reading the material they become enthralled.

The Importance of Proper Fit in Menswear

Contrary to popular belief, men’s dress clothes should always be comfortable.

If they are not, it is the fault of the clothes’ fit, and not of their nature.

Suffering for beauty’s sake does not do a man any good, either; if the fit of a garment makes its wearer uncomfortable, he will look it.

Indeed, a man looks his best when his clothes fit so well he barely notices them.

On the other hand, if his suit or dress shirt are too tight, they will be pulling and choking at every turn; too loose, and a man looks like he has had to borrow some clean clothes from his older brother as he struggles to keep them out of the way.

A man’s clothes send a message to the world about him, and if they fit him well, he will always make a good impression.

Most men today wear poorly-fitting clothes, and it is not hard to see why. The menswear sold in stores are cut to fit as many men as possible, and that means big.

At the same time, the fashion-industrial complex creates new so-called styles by bending or

The Men’s Suit: An Introduction

The men’s suit is, without question, the most universal and steadfastly appropriate item in a gentleman’s wardrobe.

There are few occasions at which a man in a quality suit will be out of place, particularly if the wearer has a firm grasp of fashion and an established personal style.

The path to elegant style begins with the suit, the cornerstone of men’s fashion.

The first thing to make clear, before diving into cuts and suit fabrics and pocket flaps, is that the rules of men’s style are guidelines gleaned across the decades from what has stood the test of time, and what generally flatters a given figure.

These style rules serve as a guide to what will enhance ones features, but they are only a guide.

The first and foremost rule of men’s style is never wear clothing that you cannot wear confidently.

Confidence is an essential element of making any ensemble work, and garments that inhibit confidence do more to damage one’s appearance than any perceived enhancement can outweigh.

This rule does not, however, provide free reign to wear whatever one wishes and declare it stylish because it is comfortable.

The Best Natural Men’s Grooming Brands

Try to buy organic and avoid additives? Is your body (sometimes) a temple? Well, you’re not alone: more of us than ever are considering what we put into our bodies these days. And with sales of natural and organic skincare products up by 20 per cent in recent years, it looks like we’re questioning what we put on them too. Then again, who wants to run the risk of ending up with a face like the Toxic Avenger’s because of a suspect additive?

Sodium laureth sulfate and sodium lauryl sulfate – two ingredients used in a raft of skincare products to make them foam – have, for example, been known to cause dermatitis, eye irritation and mouth ulcers in some cases. Parabens – preservatives used in everything from deodorants to moisturisers – are thought to negatively affect testosterone levels, while phthalates – as well as being virtually unpronounceable – have been linked to asthma, cancer, obesity and reduced fertility in men. So you can see why it’s worth saying ‘balls’ to some of your bathroom cabinet’s nastier chemicals.

Or maybe, recognising that the human race in the last 60 years has begun to negatively impact the

Stylish Weekend City Breaks

You need something to look forward to at this time of year. Subpar weather, resolutions on the brink and a bank balance still nudging the red all conspire to leave you feeling lower than DiCaprio at the Oscars.

So why not get away from it all? (Even if that does mean tunnelling into your overdraft.) Yes, a weekend city break may be a brief and sometimes tiring way of getting to know somewhere (like a one-night stand for travel enthusiasts), but it also allows you to recharge your batteries without eating too far into your annual PTO.

Like some kind of newfangled travel Tinder, this guide will hook you up with some attractive options for the coming months. Four different cities, four stylish breaks all waiting to be booty-called. Sorry, booked. We mean booked.

Barcelona, Spain

Nestled conveniently beside the Mediterranean Sea, Barcelona is the perfect location for replenishing your vitamin D stores. But, while the beach beckons, it’s worth remembering that there’s a lot more to Spain’s Catalonian capital than a 4km stretch of sand.

Put simply, if you haven’t been already, then you need to go: the coastline city’s packed full

A Few More Steps

When you are taking your first tentative steps into the world of men’s fashion and style, things can appear pretty daunting. There are almost too many options out there – making it hard to pinpoint a place to start.

We’ve already covered the top five rookie fashion mistakes that are made by newbies, along with the initial five steps to take once they’ve been fixed. But how should you be looking to progress after that?

After all, you’re beginning to get the hang of this ‘style’ thing now, aren’t you? You’ve started buying clothes that fit you properly. You now embrace a wide range of colours that you normally wouldn’t have considered. You’ve even begun thinking about what sort of clothes, styles and trends work best for YOU, regardless of what magazines and blogs tell you. Surely, there isn’t that much left to learn, right?

WRONG. There’s always more to things to learn, clothes to buy and ways to hate everything in your wardrobe. Lucky for you, I’m here to guide you in the right direction…

1. Branch Out Into Accessories

In the initial stages of your wardrobe revamp, I always recommend that

The benefits of having A Unifrom

This particular article marks a bit of a milestone for me [ed: and me], as this will be the 100th instalment in the FashionBeans Men’s Fashion Basics series. When I first started writing the series over three years ago, I never thought it would go down quite as successfully as it did, or keep going for as long as it has.

It’s a testament to how our readers want to be as knowledgeable as they can about men’s style, and just how much depth and detail there is within the world of menswear.

So I was thinking about doing something special to mark the occasion, and seeing as my normal tactic of ‘get wild ar*e drunk’ doesn’t really work in this sort of medium, I went ahead with a suggestion from one of our readers, Alex Martin. He said that it would be nice to have a round-up of all that has gone before in the series, as sometimes (not unlike men’s fashion) it can be hard to keep track of everything.

Taking a brief look back through the articles, I have to agree with him. We’ve covered a lot of ground – all the

Mens’s Fashion Basics

This particular article marks a bit of a milestone for me [ed: and me], as this will be the 100th instalment in the FashionBeans Men’s Fashion Basics series. When I first started writing the series over three years ago, I never thought it would go down quite as successfully as it did, or keep going for as long as it has.

It’s a testament to how our readers want to be as knowledgeable as they can about men’s style, and just how much depth and detail there is within the world of menswear.

So I was thinking about doing something special to mark the occasion, and seeing as my normal tactic of ‘get wild ar*e drunk’ doesn’t really work in this sort of medium, I went ahead with a suggestion from one of our readers, Alex Martin. He said that it would be nice to have a round-up of all that has gone before in the series, as sometimes (not unlike men’s fashion) it can be hard to keep track of everything.

Taking a brief look back through the articles, I have to agree with him. We’ve covered a lot of ground – all the

. A Formal Round-Up

So let’s dive straight back into it, shall we?

Suits

When it comes to the jacket, make sure that it hugs your shoulders, is slim in the body and that it covers your bottom.

The trousers should be slim, not skinny, and have a break that suits your personal taste – I tend to go for a slight break so that I can show a bit of sock when walking or sitting down.

Notch lapels are more business appropriate whilst a peak lapel communicates elegance and power. Number of buttons and vents is your prerogative.

For your first suit, go for something in a solid navy or grey and then expand from there – burgundy, olive, khaki and French blue are all viable options. Black is NEVER suitable for business or the day time (if you want something similar, go for charcoal grey instead), but can look very modern and stylish when worn in the evening.

As long as the suit fits you properly, you can dress it up or down to your tastes. Think dress shirts, grenadine ties and Derby shoes or neutral t-shirts, trainers and chambray shirts

Blazers/Sport Coats